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News & Events

News


Events

CCPP events include astrophysics seminars, high energy seminars, experimental particle physics (hep-ex) seminars, Colloquium, CCPP Brown Bag, etc.. You can view all CCPP events with CCPP Event List or CCPP Event Calendar, you can also click on following links to view CCPP seminar schedules:

Astrophysics Seminar Schedule

High Energy Seminar Schedule

Experimental Particle Physics Seminar (hep-ex) Schedule


Upcoming CCPP Events

Monday, January 22, 2018 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

CCPP Brown Bag

Neal Weiner
NYU

Light Signals of a Lighter Higgs



Tuesday, January 23, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Marilena Loverde
Stony Brook University

Neutrinos, Quintessence and Structure Formation in the Universe

The large-scale structure of our universe (the distribution of galaxies on very large-scales for instance) contains a wealth of information about the origin, evolution, and matter content of the universe. Extracting this information relies crucially on understanding how galaxies and other biased objects trace the large-scale matter distribution. In a universe such as our own, with both cold dark matter and massive neutrinos, or in alternative cosmologies with clustered quintessence, this problem is much more complicated. I will discuss new tools that my group has developed to study gravitational evolution in cosmologies with multiple fluids, the novel signatures we have identified including a new probe of neutrino mass, and the broader implications for models of large-scale structure.


Wednesday, January 24, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HEP Seminar

Thomas Bachlechner
Columbia

Tunneling in Semi-Classical Gravity

In this seminar I will carefully discuss the solution of the following problem in semi-classical quantum gravity. Consider an object of small mass in a locally Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime (Hubble parameter H_A). The object is located in an apparatus that forms a bubble of Hubble parameter H_B, separated via a thin domain wall from the original spacetime. Classically, this domain wall will expand to a finite size and eventually re-collapse. Quantum mechanically, the domain wall can tunnel through a forbidden region and expand indefinitely, leaving the object in a de Sitter region of Hubble parameter H_B, while the apparatus remains unaffected during the quantum transition. The Hamiltonian of a gravitational theory vanishes. I will discuss the quasi-local energy and how it relates to the boundary conditions. I evaluate the probability for tunneling to occur, both for H_A larger and smaller than H_B. The probability can increases with increasing Hubble scale within the bubble. I discuss this naive contradiction with entropy arguments, which would suggest that transitions to a higher entropy (smaller Hubble scale) are favored.


Wednesday, January 24, 2018 4:00 PM - 4:30 PM

726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Astro-Ph

Astro-Ph
NYU



Wednesday, January 24, 2018 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Astroparticle Group Meet

Astro Particle Group Meeting
NYU

Presentations about research projects Everyone is welcome to attend.


Thursday, January 25, 2018 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Group Meeting

Blanton, Tinker, Pullen
NYU



Thursday, January 25, 2018 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Physics Dept Colloquium

Boris Shraiman
UCSB

TBA

I am a theoretical physicist with background in statistical physics. PhD 1983 Harvard, postdoctoral fellow at U. Chicago and Bell Labs; Member of Technical Staff at Bell Labs, in the Theoretical Physics Department at Murray Hill for 16 years. Worked on a range of physics problems from correlated electrons and superconductivity to pattern formation and turbulence. Started working on biology problems about 20 years ago, while at Bell Labs. Moved to the present position as a Permanent Member of KITP and a Professor in the UCSB Dept of Physics in 2004, after two years as a Physics Professor at Rutgers. Current research interests are in: Morphogenesis, addressing the problem of “Growth and Form” in animal development. Statistical Genetics, which aims to quantitatively describe evolutionary dynamics in populations. In both subjects my work focuses on the role of interactions. In the case of morphogenesis, these are interactions between cells; in the case of population genetics, the interactions are between genetic polymorphisms. The study of “interactions” both in the developmental biology and in population genetics contexts brings up unexpected but direct and useful connections with statistical physics. Discovering, exploring and exploiting these connections in order to develop new understanding of the biological problems, is the main goal of my research. As a permanent member of KITP I am also deeply involved with developing interdisciplinary programs at KITP aimed at building up the interdisciplinary physics/biology community.


Friday, January 26, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Friday, January 26, 2018 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

HEP Journal Club

Various grad students



Friday, January 26, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HET Seminar

Soo-Jong Rey
Seoul National University

A string theory which isn't about strings

I will talk on ​​ab initio quantized bosonic string theory with left-right asymmetric worldsheet vacuum. Remarkably, ​when ​quantized​ in​ this way, the string spectrum consists only of a finite number of degrees of freedom: string gravity (massless spin-two, Kalb-Ramond and dilaton fields) and two massive spin-two Fierz-Pauli fields. The massive spin-two fields have negative norm, opposite mass-squared, and provides a Lee-Wick type extension of string gravity. I present two further evidences that this string theory is a quantum field theory. Scattering amplitude of four dilatons is shown to be a rational function of kinematic invariants, ​which,​ in D=26​, ​factorizes into contributions of massless spin-two and a pair of massive spin-two fields. The string one​ ​loop partition function is shown to perfectly agree with one loop Feynman diagram of string gravity and two massive spin-two fields. In particular, it does not exhibit modular invariance.


Friday, January 26, 2018 4:00 PM - 4:30 PM

726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Astro-Ph

Astro-Ph
NYU



Friday, January 26, 2018 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

ISC

ISC
NYU

ISC or Intellectually Stimulating Craic is a weekly seminar for Graduate and Undergraduate students that encourages the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas within the physics department. The rules are simple: 1. No physics. 2. The talk topic is classified until the last moment.


Monday, January 29, 2018 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

CCPP Brown Bag

Gaston Giribet



Tuesday, January 30, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Jennifer Barnes
Columbia University

Welcome to the multi-messenger era: a report on the first binary neutron star merger detection

On August 17th, the gravitational wave detectors LIGO and Virgo observed for the first time the signature of a binary neutron star merger. Roughly two seconds later, the Fermi satellite detected a short gamma-ray burst whose location was consistent with the position of the gravitational wave source. These signals triggered an electromagnetic follow-up campaign by dozens of groups around the world, who quickly identified an electromagnetic counterpart, which was observed over the next several weeks at energies ranging from the x-ray to the radio. These observations allowed astronomers to construct a detailed picture of an event that had previously been studied only theoretically, and to test key theories about the nature of neutron star mergers. Among these is whether mergers are the astrophysical site of r-process nucleosynthesis, which produces roughly half of elements heavier than iron. I will give an overview of the electromagnetic observations of this system, with an emphasis on the optical and infrared emission (the "kilonova") powered by the radioactive decay of elements synthesized in the merger. I will outline how recent theoretical advances allowed us to interpret kilonova observations and decode signs of heavy element production.


Wednesday, January 31, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HEP Seminar

Marcus Spradlin
IAS

TBA



Wednesday, January 31, 2018 4:00 PM - 4:30 PM

726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Astro-Ph

Astro-Ph
NYU



Wednesday, January 31, 2018 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Astroparticle Group Meet

Astro Particle Group Meeting
NYU

Presentations about research projects Everyone is welcome to attend.


Thursday, February 1, 2018 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Group Meeting

Blanton, Tinker, Pullen
NYU



Friday, February 2, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, February 6, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Phil Armitage
University of Colorado

Tidal disruption at home and abroad

Upcoming surveys of the transient sky are expected to discover large numbers of events in which stars are tidally disrupted by supermassive black holes. Among this bounty it may be possible to identify events where the black hole is part of a binary system, providing a new route to finding close supermassive black hole binaries. I will show the results of simulations of tidal disruption by close binaries, and discuss how such events may be understood and isolated. Closer to home, I will argue that the odd properties of the first interstellar visitor to the Solar System, Oumuamua, could point to it being a fragment of a larger body tidally disrupted by a giant planet during ejection from an extrasolar planetary system.


Wednesday, February 7, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HEP Seminar

Surjeet Rajendran
Berkeley

TBA



Friday, February 9, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Monday, February 12, 2018 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

CCPP Brown Bag

Paul J. Steinhardt
Princeton/IAS

TBA

TBA


Tuesday, February 13, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Ryan Foley
UC Santa Cruz

TBA (dark energy/supernovae)



Wednesday, February 14, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HEP Seminar

Clay Cordova
IAS

TBA



Friday, February 16, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, February 20, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Viviana Acquaviva
City University of New York

TBA (galaxy surveys; machine learning)



Wednesday, February 21, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HEP Seminar

Xi Yin
Harvard U.

TBA



Friday, February 23, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, February 27, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Chiara Mingarelli
Simons Center for Computational Astrophysics

TBA (supermassive black holes; gravitational waves)



Wednesday, February 28, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HEP Seminar

Nima Arkani-Hamed
IAS

Marble Statues in the Forest Beyond Quantum Mechanics and Spacetime

I will give an overview of 5 (clearly connected) appearances of ``positive geometries" in physics: (1) the amplituhedron and N=4 SYM, (2) the associahedron and general massless theories in D dimensions, (3) cosmological polytopes, and work-in-progress on (4) the positive geometry of effective field theory (a big generalization of ``positive signs" for operators--where higher dimension operator coefficients are seen to be constrained to live inside "UV/IR polytopes"), and (5) the positive geometry of conformal field theory (which underlies the bootstrap).


Friday, March 2, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, March 6, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Chang Feng
Universit of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign

TBA (large-scale structure)



Wednesday, March 7, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HEP Seminar

Anastasia Volovich
Brown U.

TBA



Friday, March 9, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, March 13, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar


No Astro Seminar (spring break)



Friday, March 16, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, March 20, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Lina Necib
Caltech

Empirical Determination of the Dark Matter Velocity Distribution

Using the hydrodynamic simulation Eris, we found that the kinematics of dark matter follows closely the kinematics of old metal poor stars, present in the Milky Way's stellar halo. We use this correspondence to obtain the first empirical measurement of the local velocity distribution of dark matter, by analyzing the Gaia data and computing the velocity distribution of metal poor stars. We find that this velocity distribution is peaked at lower velocities than the generally assumed Maxwell Boltzmann distribution, leading to a weakening of direct detection limits at dark matter masses less than 10 GeV by almost a factor of two. We also found a few kinematic outliers in the stellar data that might be hints of dark matter substructure.


Friday, March 23, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Jackie Faherty
AMNH

TBA (low-mass stars)



Friday, March 30, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, April 3, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Chris Hayward
Flatiron Institute

TBA (galaxy formation)



Friday, April 6, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, April 10, 2018 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

CUNY Graduate Center

Big Apple Colloquium

Julianne Dalcanton
University of Washington

Tba



Friday, April 13, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, April 17, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Ilsedore Cleeves
Center for Astronomy - Harvard University

TBA (proto-planetary disks)



Friday, April 20, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Friday, April 27, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Tuesday, May 1, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Astro Seminar

Ben Farr
University of Oregon

TBA (LIGO, neutron stars)



Friday, May 4, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Wednesday, May 9, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

HEP Seminar

Matthew Lippert
Long Island University

TBA



Friday, May 11, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Friday, May 18, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee



Friday, May 25, 2018 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM

726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf

Computing Committee

Computing Committee